A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Edited by Frank W. Olive
Abomination of Desolation
       Abomination of Desolation

       Idolatry with its blighting effect upon man, its degradation of the divine ideal, and its violent outward, as well as its less visible insidious, opposition to the kingdom of God.

       To Daniel was revealed: "For the half of the week, he shall cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease; and upon the wing of abominations shall come one that maketh desolate" (9:27, R. V.) : "and they shall profane the sanctuary, even the fortress, and shall take away the continual burnt offering, and they shall set up the abomination that maketh desolate" (11:31, R. V.) ; and "from the time that the continual burnt offering shall be taken away, and the abomination that maketh desolate set up, there shall be a thousand two hundred and ninety days" (12:11, R. V.).

       These prophecies depict outstanding features of the development of the kingdom of God, which are typical for all time.

       A notable fulfillment of 11:31, which the Jews were quick to discern, was the stoppage of the daily sacrifice by Antiochus Epiphanes in June, 168 B. C., and the erection on the brazen altar of an idolatrous one. on which sacrifices were offered to Jupiter Olympius (1 Mac. 1:54; 6:7; 2 Mac. 6:2; Antiq. 12:5, 4; 7, 6). But the prophecy of the abomination of desolation was not exhausted by this fulfillment.

       The prophecy belongs to Messianic times (Dan. 9:27), and yet more generally to the conflict of the kingdom of God until its final triumphant establishment (12:7, 11 with 7:25-27; cp. 12:2). Christ reiterated the prophecy, enjoining those to flee to the mountains who should see the abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet, standing in the holy place (Mat. 24:15, etc.).